Album Review: Dragon Slayer
By Pigeon John

By Paul Gibson | January 28th, 2011 | Posted In News

{October 12, 2010}

Quannum Projects

Pigeon John is about as odd of a bird that the Christian industry has ever seen. He has a great resume as a former member of LA Symphony, Brainwash Projects, and currently working with Flynn Adam in Rootbeer and has done guest verses with Grits, Heath McNease, Rod Laver, 4th Avenue Jones, KJ-52, Mars Ill and a ton more.
But with the new album Dragon Slayer, he may alienate more fans of his earlier work simply because of lyrical content. While he has hinted at cursing in previous albums he never came right out and said it. This is a fine line I know.

I was a little surprised to discover references to drinking and several instances of swearing on this record, which apart than that is quite good.

The album starts with “The Bomb,” which is a fun upbeat party jam that is fun to listen to.

“Buttersoft Seats,” has a optimistic feel to it concentrating on John’s rags to riches story. It is fun to hear how he enjoys providing for family. Although, I wonder if this story is more of a optimist look at what could be rather than what is.

“Dude, It’s On,” sounds like a relaxed look at the life in the hood, riding around in a convertible. This is one of the better examples of John’s quirky style and sound, while most would make this a hard hitting gangster esk jam he handles it with a low-key grace.

“Rock Bottom Again,” sounds like a lament of a hip-hop star struggling with his relationship with his creator. “You have always been my best friend and I always mess it up in the end. I’m hitting rock bottom again, I think I’m hitting rock bottom again.”
Most will probably find the 2 GD’s thrown in at the end a problem, which is kind of a shame cause over-all it is a great song.

“Before We’re Gone,” bemoans the dissolution of his marriage and his recent divorce. This is another hard one to justify with Christianity because it is hard to say if he is saying that the drugs, money, and booze don’t mean a thing in general or they would be more fun with his wife by his side.

“Davey Rockit,” tells the story of a Davey who moves to California to become a DJ but has to deal with real life instead.

“Hey You,” is the quintessential song about seeing a beautiful girl in a club, but has a fun upbeat rhythm with some guitar that gives it a cool vibe.

“So Gangster” will probably be where most Christian audiences will jump off. Although, it feels like it’s going for irony, the refrain of “I’m a gangster for real, I feel so d*** gangster, will probably kill it for those of the Christian faith or squeamish.

“To Do List” is laid over a funky beat that is hard to place but seems to be a drum machine layered with a ukulele. This a funny/remorseful look at not fulfilling a to-do list left to him by his wife.

The last track “Ben Vereen,” has a bitter vibe saying “I hate you so much, I wish you were never born. Silly girl you broke me my heart’s all ripped and torn.” Also, the use of a** early in song will probably get to some.

It is hard to know what to do with an album like this, artistically it is dead on. But it feels like he is going through a crisis right now, and while it creates great art it does display a great deal of issues and language that will probably cost him a good amount of fans. Overall it feels like a modern version of the Psalms, struggling with how he feels about life, his now ex-wife, and his relationship with God. Maybe I am reading way too much into this, but John will be in my thoughts and in my prayers. Life in the public eye is never easy nor is divorce. I hope that this album is therapeutic for him and help him move through the problems in life and on to a strengthened relationship with his creator.

And for those who care this isn’t a parental advisory album but does drop several g**d***’s, several d***’s, an a**, and a n*****. Be warned.

[rating stars="4"]

~Paul Gibson

Favorite Tracks:

The Bomb
Dude It’s On
Hey You
To Do List
Ben Vereen

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